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Developing and mechanical television

Author: Mondal, Abdullah

Keywords: Television
Mechanical universe (Television program)

Issue Date: 2010-07

Publisher: National Council of Science Museums, Kolkata

Description: The invention by Paul Nipkow in 1884 consisting of a disk with holes spiraling into its centre shaped the development of television. John Logie Baird used Nipkow's disk to demonstrate the first Mechanical Television in 1926. The entire system was based on mechanical Scanning of the objects and reproducing the images. Though mechanical television became outdated within fifteen years, it paved the way for development of modern television.
The working principle of a mechanical television is presented in an interactive exhibit 'Mechanical TV: How it Works' in the Television' gallery of Birla Industrial & Technological Museum. Keeping in mind the interactivity and operation of the exhibit by the Visitors in a Science museum setting, a simple and customized approach was adopted in developing the exhibit. The technique of scanning the object was thus done in a different way compared to that used in earlier Mechanical TVs. Here a parallel beam of light from a tailor-made object is first scanned by a Nipkow's disc. It is then collimated by a convex lens with large aperture. The beam is focused on a sensor; where it is picked up, amplified and fed to an electronic circuit. Instead of using a lamp as before a high glow LED is used for reproducing the image on a fluorescent screen.

Description: Includes bibliographical references.

Source: National Council of Science Museums

Type: Article

Received From: National Council of Science Museums


DC Field Value
dc.contributor.author Mondal, Abdullah
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-15T05:51:33Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-15T05:51:33Z
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.date.issued 2010-07
dc.description.abstract The invention by Paul Nipkow in 1884 consisting of a disk with holes spiraling into its centre shaped the development of television. John Logie Baird used Nipkow's disk to demonstrate the first Mechanical Television in 1926. The entire system was based on mechanical Scanning of the objects and reproducing the images. Though mechanical television became outdated within fifteen years, it paved the way for development of modern television.
The working principle of a mechanical television is presented in an interactive exhibit 'Mechanical TV: How it Works' in the Television' gallery of Birla Industrial & Technological Museum. Keeping in mind the interactivity and operation of the exhibit by the Visitors in a Science museum setting, a simple and customized approach was adopted in developing the exhibit. The technique of scanning the object was thus done in a different way compared to that used in earlier Mechanical TVs. Here a parallel beam of light from a tailor-made object is first scanned by a Nipkow's disc. It is then collimated by a convex lens with large aperture. The beam is focused on a sensor; where it is picked up, amplified and fed to an electronic circuit. Instead of using a lamp as before a high glow LED is used for reproducing the image on a fluorescent screen.
dc.source National Council of Science Museums
dc.format.extent 165-168p.: col.ill.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher National Council of Science Museums, Kolkata
dc.subject Television
Mechanical universe (Television program)
dc.type Article
dc.format.medium text
DC Field Value
dc.contributor.author Mondal, Abdullah
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-15T05:51:33Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-15T05:51:33Z
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.date.issued 2010-07
dc.description.abstract The invention by Paul Nipkow in 1884 consisting of a disk with holes spiraling into its centre shaped the development of television. John Logie Baird used Nipkow's disk to demonstrate the first Mechanical Television in 1926. The entire system was based on mechanical Scanning of the objects and reproducing the images. Though mechanical television became outdated within fifteen years, it paved the way for development of modern television.
The working principle of a mechanical television is presented in an interactive exhibit 'Mechanical TV: How it Works' in the Television' gallery of Birla Industrial & Technological Museum. Keeping in mind the interactivity and operation of the exhibit by the Visitors in a Science museum setting, a simple and customized approach was adopted in developing the exhibit. The technique of scanning the object was thus done in a different way compared to that used in earlier Mechanical TVs. Here a parallel beam of light from a tailor-made object is first scanned by a Nipkow's disc. It is then collimated by a convex lens with large aperture. The beam is focused on a sensor; where it is picked up, amplified and fed to an electronic circuit. Instead of using a lamp as before a high glow LED is used for reproducing the image on a fluorescent screen.
dc.source National Council of Science Museums
dc.format.extent 165-168p.: col.ill.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher National Council of Science Museums, Kolkata
dc.subject Television
Mechanical universe (Television program)
dc.type Article
dc.format.medium text