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The metrology behind Harappan town-planning

Author: Danino, Michel

Keywords: Indus civilization
Architecture, Ancient -- India

Issue Date: 2011-01

Publisher: National Council of Science Museums, Kolkata

Description: The existence and use of Harappan linear units have remained a riddle. Harappan town planning, in particular, has not so far been known to have used precise units, although it displays elaborate geometry. This article proposes that the site of Dholavira, in the Rann of Kachchh, enables us to calculate a possible linear unit used to lay out the fortifications. This unit, which works out to 1.9 m, is then related to a proposed Harappan angula of 1.76 cm, with a factor of 108 between the two, as indicated in later classical literature.
Besides other Harappan sites, independent research at early history and historical sites and structures - e.g., Taxila, Shishupalgarh, Thimi and the Delhi Iron Pillar - is quoted as confirmation of the proposed system - an important case of continuity between India's two urbanizations.

Description: Includes bibliographical references.

Source: National Council of Science Museums

Type: Article

Received From: National Council of Science Museums


DC Field Value
dc.contributor.author Danino, Michel
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-15T07:50:35Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-15T07:50:35Z
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.date.issued 2011-01
dc.description.abstract The existence and use of Harappan linear units have remained a riddle. Harappan town planning, in particular, has not so far been known to have used precise units, although it displays elaborate geometry. This article proposes that the site of Dholavira, in the Rann of Kachchh, enables us to calculate a possible linear unit used to lay out the fortifications. This unit, which works out to 1.9 m, is then related to a proposed Harappan angula of 1.76 cm, with a factor of 108 between the two, as indicated in later classical literature.
Besides other Harappan sites, independent research at early history and historical sites and structures - e.g., Taxila, Shishupalgarh, Thimi and the Delhi Iron Pillar - is quoted as confirmation of the proposed system - an important case of continuity between India's two urbanizations.
dc.source National Council of Science Museums
dc.format.extent 59-70p.: col.ill.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher National Council of Science Museums, Kolkata
dc.subject Indus civilization
Architecture, Ancient -- India
dc.type Article
dc.identifier.issuenumber 1
dc.format.medium text
DC Field Value
dc.contributor.author Danino, Michel
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-15T07:50:35Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-15T07:50:35Z
dc.description Includes bibliographical references.
dc.date.issued 2011-01
dc.description.abstract The existence and use of Harappan linear units have remained a riddle. Harappan town planning, in particular, has not so far been known to have used precise units, although it displays elaborate geometry. This article proposes that the site of Dholavira, in the Rann of Kachchh, enables us to calculate a possible linear unit used to lay out the fortifications. This unit, which works out to 1.9 m, is then related to a proposed Harappan angula of 1.76 cm, with a factor of 108 between the two, as indicated in later classical literature.
Besides other Harappan sites, independent research at early history and historical sites and structures - e.g., Taxila, Shishupalgarh, Thimi and the Delhi Iron Pillar - is quoted as confirmation of the proposed system - an important case of continuity between India's two urbanizations.
dc.source National Council of Science Museums
dc.format.extent 59-70p.: col.ill.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher National Council of Science Museums, Kolkata
dc.subject Indus civilization
Architecture, Ancient -- India
dc.type Article
dc.identifier.issuenumber 1
dc.format.medium text